Estate Planning and Tax Consequences

One common facet of estate preparing for everyone, however, is the requirements into consideration the possible tax consequences of estate planning. Both estate taxes and/or gift taxes are effective in reducing the assets with your estate up to 55 percent without careful estate planning ahead of your energy. A basic comprehension of how estate and gift taxes operate can help you understand the requirement for thorough estate planning.

– Estate Taxes:

When you die, your estate assets must be inventoried and valued as of the date of death. The total of most estate assets is then potentially subject to estate taxes. Your estate might take advantage of the existing exemption amount that refers to all estates. The exemption amount fluctuates every year. For 2012 the exemption amount is $5,120,000 — an all-time high. For 2013, however, it is set to return to $1 million unless Congress passes a whole new tax law. All assets over the exemption amount are going to be taxed. The tax rate also changes every year on account of modifications in the federal tax laws passed by Congress. Although the tax rate for 2012 reaches 35 %, that, too, is scheduled to improve to 55 percent for 2013 unless Congress acts. Unfortunately, there is no way to find out if you will die or what the actual exemption amount or tax rate will probably be. Planning for the worst-case scenario is most beneficial.

– Gift Taxes:

In the event you are planning that gifting your estate assets just before death may be the solution to avoiding estate taxes, reconsider. Gifts may also be taxed should they be over the lifetime exemption amount. These amounts, just like the estate exemption and tax rate amounts, will also be subject to change every year as federal tax laws change. … Read more ...