Facts About Bridging Loans and Bridging Finance

Bridging finance can be taken out on a first or a second charge basis. Some lenders use the term ‘closed’ bridging loan, meaning there is a fixed term to the contract usually applicable when completion dates for buying a new property and selling one are known. An ‘open’ bridging loan is where there is no fixed term to the contract.

Bridging loans are available for all types of clients from limited companies to individuals; from those with excellent credit status to those who have found it difficult to obtain mortgages and loans, including businesses, self-employed, and those with poor credit history.

All types of security can be considered, from residential, semi-commercial, and commercial properties or land. Properties can be fully or partially developed, in perfect condition or need of renovation, plus standard or non-standard construction. A bridging loan can be taken out across some securities and/or some clients.

Uses

The traditional use of a bridging loan is to purchase a new home before a buyer has been found for the current property. This type of chain-breaking finance became popular in a buoyant and fast-moving property market. As well as increased demand from house buyers who need to prevent a house purchase falling through, the different uses for bridging finance are now extremely varied.

Bridging finance is used for property development including site purchase, self-build projects, and property conversions. In the property investment market bridging loans can be used for completing purchases quickly; for example, when the property has been secured at auction clients usually only have up to 28 days to complete. They can also be cost-effective for clients wishing to acquire property for refurbishment and re-sale.

In circumstances where a re-mortgage is taking too long for whatever reason, a bridging loan can pay off the initial mortgage whilst a … Read more ...